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Absorption of enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin after oral and subcutaneous administration in diseased koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus)

J. E. GRIFFITH* D. P. HIGGINS* K. M. LIt M. B. KROCKENBERGER* & M. GOVENDIR*

*Faculty of Veterinary Science; tSydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia

ABSTRACT

Koalas (n = 43) were treated daily for up to 8 weeks with enrofloxacin: 10 mg⁄kg subcutaneously (s.c.), 5 mg⁄kg s.c., or 20 mg⁄kg per os (p.o.); or marbofloxacin: 1.0–3.3 mg⁄kg p.o., 10 mg⁄kg p.o. or 5 mg⁄kg s.c. Serial plasma drug concentrations were determined on day 1 and again at approximately 2 weeks, by liquid chromatography. The median (range) plasma maximum concentrations (Cmax) for enrofloxacin 5 mg⁄kg s.c. and 10 mg⁄kg s.c. were 0.83 (0.68–1.52) and 2.08 (1.34–2.96) µg⁄mL and the median (range) Tmax were 1.5 h (1–2) and 1 h (1–2) respectively. Plasma concentrations of orally dosed marbofloxacin were too low to be quantified. Oral administration of enrofloxacin suggested absorption rate limited disposition pharmacokinetics; the median (range) Cmax for enrofloxacin 20 mg⁄kg p.o. was 0.94 (0.76–1.0) µg⁄mL and the median (range) Tmax was 4 h (2–8). Oral absorption of both drugs was poor. Plasma protein binding for enrofloxacin was 55.4 ± 1.9% and marbofloxacin 49.5 ± 5.3%. Elevations in creatinine kinase activity were associated with drug injections. Enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin administered at these dosage and routes are unlikely to inhibit the growth of chlamydial pathogens in vivo.

 

 

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